What Not to Plant with Peppers: The Best Companion Plant For Peppers!

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What Not to Plant with Peppers

Companion planting is crucial to growing peppers successfully. Understanding what not to plant with peppers can help you avoid common mistakes and maximize your gardening prowess.

Certain plants should be avoided when planting peppers, while others can be beneficial. By choosing the right companion plants, you can create an environment that promotes the optimal growth of your pepper plants.

Key Takeaways

  • Avoid planting cabbagebroccolicauliflower, and fennel near peppers, as these plants prefer different soil acidity levels and may inhibit pepper growth.
  • Practice crop rotation every few years when planting peppers alongside compatible plants like eggplants and tomatoes to prevent the buildup of pests and diseases.
  • Cilantro, marigolds, and onions are good companion plants for peppers. These plants attract beneficial insectsrepel pests, and provide various benefits to peppers.
  • Consider other companion plants, such as basilcarrotsnasturtiumscornbeans, and cucumbers, which offer shade, nutrient enrichment, and protection against pests.
  • When selecting companion plants, consider their environmental requirements and the benefits they provide regarding pest repulsion and attracting beneficial wildlife.
  • Experimentation and diversification of planting schemes can help create a healthy and productive garden.

Plants to Avoid Planting Near Peppers

While peppers thrive when planted with suitable companions, specific plants can hinder their growth and should be avoided. These plants have different soil acidity requirements and may interfere with the optimal development of peppers.

The following plants are known to be bad companions for peppers:

Non Companion plants - Cabbage, Fennel and Broccoli
PlantReason
CabbageInterferes with pepper growth due to its high nutrient requirements and potential competition for resources.
BroccoliProduces chemicals that can inhibit pepper growth and attract pests.
CauliflowerRequires similar soil conditions as peppers but tends to compete for resources, affecting the growth of both plants.
FennelProduces chemicals that inhibit the growth of nearby plants, including peppers.
Recommended non-companion plants for peppers.

Compatible plants can be grown alongside peppers to promote healthy growth and enhance flavor. It is important to practice crop rotation when planting peppers with suitable companions. 

Crop rotation every few years helps prevent the buildup of pests and diseases, ensuring the long-term success of your garden.

Experimenting and diversifying your planting schemes can lead to a more productive garden. By considering the environmental requirements of companion plants, such as light, water, and soil conditions, you can create a harmonious planting arrangement that fosters pepper growth.

Some excellent choices for companion plants include cilantromarigolds, and onions. They attract beneficial insects and repel pests that can damage peppers. [1]

Choosing suitable pepper companions is critical to creating a healthy and productive garden. By avoiding incompatible plants and selecting suitable companions, you can ensure optimal growth and a bountiful harvest of delicious peppers.

Cabbage, Broccoli, Cauliflower, and Fennel

Cabbagebroccolicauliflower, and fennel should not be planted near peppers as they prefer different soil acidity levels and can hinder pepper growth.

These plants have specific environmental requirements and may compete for resources with peppers, impacting their overall health and productivity. Understanding the potential adverse effects of these plants and avoiding planting them near peppers is essential.

“Companion planting involves carefully selecting plants that benefit each other when grown together. However, not all plants are compatible, and certain combinations can lead to unfavorable outcomes.” Mark Bratche, Professional Gardener and Landscaper @ cityblooming.com

To ensure optimal growth for peppers, it is vital to consider their specific needs and plant them alongside compatible companions. For instance, peppers can be paired with plants like eggplants and tomatoes as long as crop rotation is practiced.

Crop rotation helps prevent the buildup of pests and diseases, ensuring a healthy growing environment for the peppers.

Plants to Avoid Planting Near Peppers:Companion Plants for Peppers:
CabbageCilantro
BroccoliMarigolds
CauliflowerOnions
FennelBasil

When it comes to companion planting for peppers, exploring other options that can promote their growth and overall well-being is beneficial.

Cilantro, marigolds, and onions are excellent choices as they offer various advantages. Cilantro attracts beneficial insects while repelling pests, making it a valuable companion for peppers.

With their vibrant blooms, marigolds attract beneficial insects and help deter pests that can damage pepper plants. Onions provide natural protection against slugs, aphids, mites, and cabbage worms, which can otherwise harm peppers.

Gardeners can create a harmonious and productive garden by choosing the right companion plants for peppers and considering their environmental requirements, such as light, water, and soil conditions. 

Experimentation and diversifying planting schemes can also contribute to healthy and thriving pepper plants, enhancing the overall beauty and productivity of the garden.

The Role of Crop Rotation

When planting peppers alongside eggplants and tomatoes, it is vital to practice crop rotation to maintain a healthy garden and prevent the accumulation of pests and diseases.

Crop rotation is the practice of changing the location of crops within the garden each year to avoid planting the same plant family in the same spot.

This helps break the life cycle of pests and diseases that may have built up in the soil, reducing the risk of infestation and improving overall plant health.

Crop rotation not only aids in pest and disease control but also helps to maintain soil fertility. Different plants have varying nutrient requirements, so rotating crops ensures that the soil remains balanced regarding nutrient availability.

For example, peppers are heavy feeders, while legumes like beans fix nitrogen in the soil. Rotating peppers with beans can replenish the soil with nitrogen, promoting healthier and more productive pepper plants.

The Benefits of Crop Rotation

  • Prevents the buildup of pests and diseases
  • It helps maintain soil fertility and nutrient balance
  • Improves overall plant health and productivity
  • Reduces the reliance on synthetic fertilizers and pesticides

When planning your crop rotation, it is essential to consider the plant families and their compatibility. Avoid planting peppers, eggplants, and tomatoes in the same area for consecutive years, as they all belong to the nightshade family (Solanaceae) and are susceptible to similar pests and diseases.

Instead, rotate them with plants from different families, such as leafy greens, root crops, or legumes. This ensures that the soil remains fertile, promotes biodiversity, and reduces the risk of pest and disease infestations.

Tomato field used in the rotation of crops
Year 1Year 2Year 3Year 4
PeppersLeafy Greens (e.g., lettuce)Legumes (e.g., beans)Root Crops (e.g., carrots)
EggplantsRoot Crops (e.g., beets)PeppersLeafy Greens (e.g., spinach)
TomatoesLegumes (e.g., peas)EggplantsLegumes (e.g., lentils)
Crop Rotation Plan

Following a crop rotation plan like the above example can help you maintain a healthy and productive garden while minimizing the risk of pest and disease problems.

Remember to document your crop rotation schedule, as it might be challenging to remember which plants were grown in each area yearly.

With proper crop rotation and thoughtful planning, you can enjoy bountiful harvests of peppers and other crops while promoting a sustainable and environmentally friendly garden.

Companion Plants for Peppers

To enhance the growth of peppers and protect them from pests, consider planting companion plants such as cilantro, marigolds, and onions. These plants not only add beauty to the garden but also provide various benefits that promote the health and productivity of your pepper plants.

Cilantro is an excellent choice, attracting beneficial insects such as ladybugs and lacewings while repelling pests like aphids and spider mites. Its low-growing habit won’t compete with peppers for space, making it an ideal companion plant.

Marigolds are another great option. They add vibrant colors to the garden and deter pests like nematodes, aphids, and whiteflies. Additionally, marigolds attract beneficial insects such as bees and butterflies, creating a dynamic and balanced ecosystem.

Onions are a versatile cooking ingredient that protects against various pests that can harm peppers. They repel slugs, aphids, mites, and cabbage worms, helping to keep your pepper plants healthy and thriving.

Companion Plants - Cilantro, Onion and Marigold
Companion PlantBenefits
CilantroAttracts beneficial insects, repels pests
MarigoldsDeter pests and attract beneficial insects
OnionsRepels slugs, aphids, mites, and cabbage worms
Companion Plants for Peppers: Benefits and Uses

These are just a few examples of companion plants that can be grown alongside peppers. Basilcarrots, and nasturtiums also make excellent companions, enhancing flavor, providing shade, and attracting beneficial insects. 

Corn, beans, cucumbers, and other root crops offer beneficial properties such as shade, wind protection, and nitrogen fixation.

When choosing companion plants for peppers, consider their environmental requirements, such as light, water, and soil conditions. Additionally, consider their benefits, such as repelling pests or attracting beneficial wildlife.

Experimentation and diversifying your planting schemes can help create a healthy and productive garden where peppers thrive alongside their companion plants.

Basil, Carrots, and Nasturtiums

In addition to cilantro, marigolds, onions, basil, carrots, and nasturtiums are excellent choices for companion planting with peppers. These plants provide various benefits that can enhance pepper plants’ growth and overall health.

Basil adds a delicious flavor to your meals and is a natural pest repellent. Its intense aroma deters pests like aphids, flies, and mosquitoes. Planting basil alongside peppers can help protect them from these unwanted visitors.

Additionally, basil provides some shade to peppers, which can be beneficial during hot summer days.

Carrots are known for loosening the soil, making it easier for pepper roots to penetrate and access nutrients. They also provide shade to peppers, keeping the soil moist and cool. Growing carrots alongside peppers maximize garden space and promotes healthy root development and plant growth.

Nasturtiums are beautiful flowers that serve a dual purpose in the garden. They attract beneficial insects like ladybugs and hoverflies, which prey on pests that can harm pepper plants.

Nasturtiums also have a unique ability to repel pests such as aphids, whiteflies, and squash bugs. Their vibrant blooms add color and visual appeal to the garden while providing natural protection for peppers.

Companion Plants - Basil, Carrots, and Nasturtiums

Basil, carrots, and nasturtiums are excellent companion plants for peppers. Basil repels pests and provides shade. Carrots loosen the soil and offer shade, while nasturtiums attract beneficial insects and repel pests.

Incorporating these plants into your pepper garden can create a harmonious environment that promotes healthy growth and a bountiful harvest.

Corn, Beans, and Cucumbers: Ideal Companion Plants for Peppers

Corn, beans, and cucumbers are ideal companion plants for peppers, as they offer shade, fix nitrogen, and complement the growth of peppers. These plants create a harmonious environment in the garden, benefiting each other while maximizing space and resources.

Corn provides a tall, sturdy structure that shades peppers, protecting them from excessive sun exposure and heat. Corn plants also act as windbreaks, minimizing the risk of damage to pepper plants caused by strong winds.

The dense foliage of corn also helps retain soil moisture, preventing the soil from drying out too quickly.

Beans are nitrogen-fixing plants, meaning they can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that plants can use. This process enriches the soil with nitrogen, an essential nutrient for peppers’ growth and development.

The beans’ climbing habit allows them to grow vertically and efficiently using garden space without competing with peppers for resources.

Cucumbers are excellent companion plants for peppers due to their shallow root systems. This allows them to coexist alongside peppers without competing for nutrients and water. Cucumbers also shade peppers, mainly when grown on a trellis or support structure.

Their lush foliage helps create a microclimate that benefits cucumbers and peppers by preserving soil moisture and moderating temperature fluctuations.

Companion Plants - Corn, Beans, and Cucumbers
Companion PlantsBenefits
CornOffers shade and wind protection
BeansFixes nitrogen, enriching the soil
CucumbersProvides shade and preserves soil moisture
Companion Plants for Peppers

Other Companions for Peppers

While corn, beans, and cucumbers are standout companion plants for peppers, other options exist. For example, basil enhances the flavor of peppers while repelling pests. Carrots provide shade and help loosen the soil, making it easier for pepper roots to penetrate.

Nasturtiums attract beneficial insects that prey on pests, offering natural pest control.

Expanding further, you can plant peas, lettucechardspinach, and other root crops alongside peppers. These plants provide environmental benefits like soil improvement and water conservation and efficiently use garden space.

“Companion planting is a strategy that allows gardeners to optimize space, boost yields, and promote overall garden health. By carefully selecting the right companions for peppers, you can create a thriving ecosystem that benefits all plants involved.”– Mark Bratche, Professional Gardener and Landscaper @ cityblooming.com

When choosing companion plants for peppers, consider their environmental requirements, such as light, water, and soil conditions. Additionally, assess their benefits, such as repelling pests or attracting beneficial wildlife.

Experimentation and diversifying your planting schemes can lead to a healthy and productive garden where peppers thrive alongside their companions.

Other Root Crops and Plants for Peppers

Lettucechardspinach, and other root crops are excellent choices for companion planting with peppers. They offer environmental benefits and efficiently utilize garden space. These plants provide a beautiful addition to your garden and contribute to your pepper plants’ overall health and productivity.

In addition to their nutritional value, lettuce, chard, and spinach create a dense canopy that shades the soil, reducing evaporation and conserving moisture for your peppers.

They also act as living mulch, suppressing weed growth and maintaining soil temperature. This, in turn, helps to conserve water and reduce the need for frequent watering.

These leafy greens have shallow root systems that coexist well with peppers, as they do not compete for nutrients. Instead, they complement each other by enhancing soil structure and fertility.

Growing root crops such as carrots alongside peppers also offers several benefits. The deep taproots of carrots help break up compacted soil, improving drainage and aeration, which promotes healthy root development for both crops.

Companion Plants  - Lettuce, chard, spinach
Companion PlantsBenefits
LettuceShades soil, suppresses weeds, conserves water
ChardShades soil, enhances soil structure, reduces evaporation
SpinachShades soil acts as a living mulch, maintains soil temperature
CarrotsImproves soil drainage and aeration, promotes healthy root development
Companion Plants for Peppers

When planting these root crops alongside peppers, it is crucial to consider their environmental requirements. Lettuce, chard, and spinach prefer cooler temperatures and partial shade, so it is best to position them on the north side of your pepper plants to avoid shading them.

Carrots, on the other hand, need full sun and well-draining soil. Providing the right conditions for each plant will ensure their successful growth and compatibility with your peppers.

By incorporating a variety of other root crops and plants into your pepper garden, you can create a diverse and balanced ecosystem that promotes healthy growth and minimizes pest infestations.

These companion plants offer environmental benefits and contribute to your garden’s beauty and productivity.

Considerations when Choosing Companion Plants

When selecting companion plants for peppers, it is crucial to consider their environmental requirements and benefits regarding pest control and attracting beneficial wildlife.

The right combination of companion plants can create a harmonious environment in your garden, promoting optimal growth and productivity for your peppers.

One important consideration is the environmental requirements of both the peppers and the companion plants. Pay attention to factors such as light, water, and soil conditions. Some plants may thrive in full sun, while others prefer partial shade.

Similarly, some plants may require moist soil, while others prefer well-draining soil. You can ensure they all thrive together by choosing companion plants with similar environmental preferences to your peppers.

In addition to environmental requirements, consider companion plants’ benefits. Some plants are known to repel pests, protecting your peppers from infestations. For example, planting cilantro alongside your peppers can attract beneficial insects while repelling pests.

Marigolds are another great choice, as they attract beneficial insects and deter pests. Onions can protect your peppers from slugs, aphids, mites, and cabbage worms.

Companion PlantBenefit
CilantroAttracts beneficial insects, repels pests
MarigoldsAttracts valuable insects, deters pests
OnionsProtects against slugs, aphids, mites, cabbage worms
Companion Plants for Peppers and Their Considerations

Some companion plants can attract beneficial wildlife to your garden. Nasturtiums, for instance, are not only attractive flowers but also attract beneficial insects that prey on pests. They serve as a natural pest control solution for your peppers.

Additionally, diversifying your planting schemes can help create a healthy and productive garden. By including a variety of companion plants, you can promote biodiversity and create a balanced ecosystem that supports the growth of your peppers.

By considering the environmental requirements of companion plants, their pest control benefits, and their ability to attract beneficial wildlife, you can choose the perfect companions for your peppers. Experimentation is encouraged to find the best combinations for your garden.

With careful selection and thoughtful planning, you can create a thriving garden that provides a bountiful harvest of peppers and supports your garden ecosystem’s overall health and sustainability.

Experimentation and Diversifying Planting Schemes

Experimentation and diversifying your planting schemes can lead to a healthy and productive garden, especially when it comes to companion planting for peppers.

Companion planting - Eggplant, Paprika and Cucumber plants

By trying different combinations of companion plants, you can create a harmonious environment that promotes the growth and well-being of your peppers.

One way to diversify your planting schemes is by incorporating a variety of herbs and flowers alongside your peppers. Cilantro, for example, adds flavor to your dishes and attracts beneficial insects that help control pests.

Marigolds are another great choice, as they deter pests and add a vibrant splash of color to your garden.

“Great gardens result from a willingness to experiment and try new things.” Mark Bratche, Professional Gardener and landscaper @ cityblooming.com

Consider planting onions alongside your peppers as well. Onions have a pungent smell that repels slugs, aphids, mites, and cabbage worms. Plus, they add a savory kick to your culinary creations.

Table: Companion Plants for Peppers

Companion PlantsBenefits
BasilEnhances flavor, repels pests
CarrotsIt provides shade, loosens soil
NasturtiumsAttracts beneficial insects
CornProvides shade, wind protection
BeansFixes nitrogen

Aside from herbs and flowers, other plants can be beneficial companions for peppers. Corn, for example, provides shade and wind protection, which can benefit peppers during hot summer months.

Conversely, beans fix nitrogen in the soil, enriching it with nutrients that benefit peppers’ growth.

Don’t be afraid to get creative with your planting schemes. Peppers can also be grown alongside cucumbers, peas, lettuce, chard, spinach, and other root crops.

These plants provide environmental benefits and efficiently use space in your garden, maximizing your harvest potential.

Remember to consider the environmental requirements of each companion plant, such as light, water, and soil conditions, to ensure compatibility with your peppers.

By experimenting and diversifying your planting schemes, you can create a thriving garden that supports the growth of your peppers and enhances the overall beauty of your outdoor space.

Creating a Healthy and Productive Garden

By understanding the principles of companion planting and avoiding incompatible plants, you can create a healthy and productive garden that promotes pepper growth.

Regarding companion planting for peppers, selecting the best companion plants for peppers can make all the difference in optimizing your garden’s productivity.

One effective strategy is to avoid planting cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and fennel near peppers. These plants have different soil acidity preferences and can hinder peppers’ growth.

However, you can still successfully grow peppers alongside compatible plants like eggplants and tomatoes by practicing crop rotation every few years. This helps prevent the buildup of pests and diseases and ensures the long-term health of your pepper plants.

On the other hand, numerous plants can thrive alongside peppers and offer additional benefits. Cilantro, marigolds, and onions make excellent companions for peppers. Cilantro attracts beneficial insects while repelling pests, making it a great addition to your pepper patch.

Marigolds attract helpful insects and act as natural pest deterrents. Onions offer protection from slugs, aphids, mites, and cabbage worms. 

Companion planting with Marigolds

Furthermore, plants like basil, carrots, nasturtiums, corn, beans, cucumbers, and various root crops can also be grown alongside peppers. Basil enhances the flavor of peppers and repels pests, while carrots provide shade and help loosen the soil.

Nasturtiums attract beneficial insects that control pests, while corn and beans provide shade and wind protection. Cucumbers and other root crops, such as lettuce, chard, and spinach, offer environmental benefits and maximize space in your garden.

Companion Plants for PeppersBenefits
CilantroAttracts beneficial insects, repels pests
MarigoldsAttracts valuable insects, deters pests
OnionsProtects against slugs, aphids, mites, and cabbage worms
BasilEnhances flavor, repels pests
CarrotsIt provides shade, loosens soil
NasturtiumsAttracts beneficial insects
CornProvides shade, wind protection
BeansFixes nitrogen
CucumbersProvides shade, maximizes space
PeasProvides support, fixes nitrogen
Lettuce, Chard, SpinachProvides environmental benefits, maximizes space
Companion Plants for Peppers and Benefits

When choosing companion plants for peppers, it’s essential to consider their environmental requirements and the benefits they provide. Light, water, and soil conditions should be considered to ensure optimal growth. [2]

Select plants that repel pests or attract beneficial wildlife to create a well-balanced ecosystem in your garden.

Experimentation and diversifying your planting schemes can help you discover the best companion plant combinations for your peppers.

By observing the interactions between different plants and continuously adapting your garden, you can create a harmonious environment that fosters the growth of your peppers and leads to a bountiful harvest.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on What Not to Plant With Peppers

Q: What are good companion plants for peppers?

A: Tomatoes, basil, oregano, parsley, marjoram, and thyme are good companion plants for peppers.

Q: Can I plant other pepper plants next to my peppers?

A: It is not recommended to plant other pepper plants directly next to your peppers, as they can compete for nutrients and space.

Q: What are harmful companion plants for peppers?

A: Bad companion plants for peppers include fennel, kohlrabi, and potatoes. These plants can negatively affect the growth and flavor of peppers.

Q: Can I grow peppers and tomatoes together?

A: Yes, peppers and tomatoes make good companion plants and can be grown together in the same garden bed.

Q: Can I grow peppers and basil together?

A: Peppers and basil are good companion plants and can be grown together. Basil can help repel pests that are harmful to peppers.

Q: Can I grow peppers in containers?

A: Yes, u003ca href=u0022https://evergreenblooming.com/guide-to-growing-serrano-peppers-in-pots/u0022 data-type=u0022postu0022 data-id=u00221867u0022u003epeppers can be grown in containersu003c/au003e as long as the containers are large enough to accommodate the plants’ root systems and have proper drainage.

Q: What plants help peppers grow?

A: Plants such as onions, garlic, and chives can help peppers grow by repelling harmful pests.

Q: Can I grow peppers alongside other plants?

A: Yes, peppers can be grown alongside other plants as long as they are compatible regarding watering and sunlight requirements.

Q: Are bell peppers and hot peppers good companion plants?

A: u003ca href=u0022https://evergreenblooming.com/how-to-grow-bell-peppers/u0022 data-type=u0022postu0022 data-id=u00222546u0022u003eBell and hot peppersu003c/au003e can be grown with similar cultivation requirements.

Q: Can I grow sweet peppers and hot peppers together?

A: Sweet and hot peppers can be grown together without issues. They can coexist in the u003ca href=u0022https://evergreenblooming.com/best-raised-garden-beds-for-seniors/u0022u003esame garden bedu003c/au003e.

Art picture of various peppers

Final Thoughts on What Not to Plant With Peppers

Companion planting for peppers is an important aspect of pepper gardening, as it ensures pepper plants’ health and optimal growth in a diverse and environmentally friendly garden.

Knowing what plants to avoid planting near peppers and which ones make great companions, you can create a harmonious garden ecosystem that benefits all the plants.

Regarding plants to avoid, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and fennel are incompatible with peppers due to their different soil acidity preferences.

However, peppers can be successfully planted alongside eggplants and tomatoes if you practice crop rotation every few years to prevent pest and disease buildup.

Several plants can be paired with peppers to enhance their growth. Cilantro, marigolds, and onions are all excellent choices.

Cilantro attracts beneficial insects and repels pests, while marigolds attract beneficial insects and deter pests. Onions, on the other hand, protect against slugs, aphids, mites, and cabbage worms.

You can also consider planting basil, carrots, nasturtiums, corn, beans, cucumbers, peas, lettuce, chard, spinach, and other root crops alongside peppers.

These plants provide various benefits such as enhancing flavor, giving shade, fixing nitrogen, attracting beneficial insects, and efficiently using garden space. However, it’s important to consider the environmental requirements of each companion plant and their compatibility with peppers.

Experimentation and diversifying your planting schemes are encouraged to discover the best combinations of companion plants for peppers and to create a healthy and productive garden.

By incorporating companion planting principles, you can optimize the growth of your pepper plants and contribute to a more sustainable and environmentally friendly garden.

Further Recommendations:

Video: Companion Plants For Peppers

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9 responses to “What Not to Plant with Peppers: The Best Companion Plant For Peppers!”

  1. PlantLady Avatar
    PlantLady

    Great advice on peppers! Going to try some of these companions in my greenhouse. Thanks for the article!

  2. ZaneTheBrain Avatar
    ZaneTheBrain

    Interesting read. Did a quick check and companion planting does have some scientific backing, especially regarding pest control.

  3. veggieJen Avatar
    veggieJen

    Does crop rotation help with soil diseases? I’m trying to plan my garden layout and any advice would be appreciated!

    1. EcoWarrior Avatar
      EcoWarrior

      Yes, crop rotation can significantly reduce the chances of soil-borne diseases by disrupting the lifecycle of pests and pathogens.

    2. GreenTRookie Avatar
      GreenTRookie

      Oh cool, didn’t know that! any tips on how to start with crop rotation?

  4. herbalista80 Avatar
    herbalista80

    Loving the idea of planting basil with peppers. Gonna try this combo this spring. Thanks for the tips, Tracy!

  5. JJSparks Avatar
    JJSparks

    always thought you could just plant anything together, crazy how some plants can be picky about their neighbors lol

  6. TillyM Avatar
    TillyM

    Hey, was wondering if planting basil really helps peppers grow better? i got a tiny city garden and wanna make the most of it.

    1. GardenGuru101 Avatar
      GardenGuru101

      Basil can improve the flavor of peppers and also repel some pests. It’s a good choice for maximizing your garden space efficiently.

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